Another knitted toy – baby penguin

 penguin1

Just the other day, I was taking a walk and came upon a pile of granite along the side of  the walk.  I was minding my own business, when a slight rustling caught the corner of my right eye.  So, I turned to see what or who was trying to catch my attention.  And peering out from the shelter of the rocks was this little baby penguin…she couldn’t have been more than a few weeks old.  I wondered where the parental units were as adult penguins are known to be doting parents.  

Here’s a few interesting facts about penguins.  All penguins, male and female, share the incubation duties, with the exception of the Emperor Penguin.  All penguins are countershaded for camouflage, i.e., they have a white underside and a dark upper side.  A predator looking up from below (such as an orca, leopard seal or shark) has difficulty distinguishing between a white penguin belly and the reflective water surace.  The dark, usually black, plumage on their backs camouflages them from above.

Penguins either waddle on their feet or slide on their bellies across the snow, a movement called “tobogganing”, which conserves energy while moving quickly. They also jump with both feet together if they want to move more quickly or cross steep or rocky terrain. 

When mothers lose a chick, they sometimes attempt to “steal” another mother’s chick, usually unsuccessfully as other females in the vicinity assist the defending mother in keeping her chick. In some species, such as Emperor Penguins, young penguins assemble in large groups called crèches.

The baby penguin pattern is from an old 1981 book, which I will post in a few days. 

I’m going now, and hope the quote below brings a chuckle out of you 🙂

wcfields